Author Archives: Kim

MATERIAL MEMORIES

A Special Gallery Exhibition Featuring
Internationally Acclaimed Contemporary Artists,
Kim Henigman Bruce & Naoko Morisawa
March 2 – April 2, 2017
Opening First Thursday, March 2, 2017 6:00-8:30 pm

MATERIAL MEMORIES explores personal and cultural memory, metaphor, and mission, through work created in simple, ancient materials – beeswax (Kim Henigman Bruce) and wood or paper (Naoko Morisawa) – made relevant to a contemporary era. Both artists draw from their personal lives and their respective cultural history – Henigman Bruce is from Calgary, Canada and Morisawa, raised in Yokohama, Japan, currently resides in Seattle, WA.
Both women are highly skilled, independent artists from two distinctively different cultures and backgrounds, who share a common practice of art as a transcendent force for consciousness, social progress, and our common humanity.

Kim Henigman Bruce grew up in Calgary, Alberta, where she currently resides and received her arts education at The Alberta College of Art and Design and The University of Calgary. Her mother’s love of books was an early influence, and they’ve played a critical role as the key unifying object in her sculpture’s narratives. Books became a metaphor for knowledge; a message she’s honed well over many years as a professional artist with numerous international exhibitions. Her work speaks predominantly to girls and women; often from cultures in which women have no choices other than those pre-determined by the culture’s tradition. “Knowledge is power and knowledge is empowering. There’s choice. When there is no alternative there is no choice.” (www.kimbruce.ca) *Ms. Bruce has elected not to attend the show’s opening in protest of this administration’s still-pending travel ban. The gallery stands with our artist and supports her decision without reservation. Her statement can be found here: http://kimbruce.ca/finding-my-conviction/

Naoko Morisawa, born in Tokyo, raised in Yokohama, Japan, and now residing in Seattle, received her BA in Design and Ceramics from Tama Art University, Tokyo. Her wood mosaics are contemporary updates of the traditional art of Japanese wood mosaic, yosegi, popular in Japan’s Edo Period (1615-1868). Drawing inspiration from this ancient cultural history, her hand-crafted mosaics – meticulously composed of hand cut wood and/or paper, and stained in brilliant, complimentary hues – reflect the spirit of Edo Japonism; Noh and Kabuki theatre; ukiyo-e; the traditions of Kimono design; and reverence for nature; as well as more personal, whimsical subjects. Morisawa, who also taught art in Tokyo and Yokohama, has created several public, site-specific installations throughout the Puget Sound region, has been featured in numerous juried national and international gallery exhibitions, won dozens of awards and honors, and was selected for The Dublin Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary Art, Dublin, Ireland. Immediately following the opening of “Material Memories”, she leaves for Texas where she’s included in the Women’s Invitational Exhibition 2017, at The Eisemann Center of Performing and Visual Arts in Richardson, TX. (www.naokomorisawa.com)

HENIGMAN BRUCE – JUSTICE, Encaustic, fabric, book pages & string, 16.5″h x 4.25″w x 4.5″d

NAOKO MORISAWA ENERGY VII – ENLIVENED, UNITED (2017) 40″ x 30″ Mosaic Collage – Oil Stained Wood & Paper, Acrylic, Oil, Washi on Board


FREDERICK HOLMES AND COMPANY
GALLERY OF MODERN & CONTEMPORARY ART
309 OCCIDENTAL AVENUE SOUTH
SEATTLE, WA 98104
(206) 682-0166
WWW.FREDERICKHOLMESANDCOMPANY.COM

Finding My Conviction (Canadian artist refuses to attend her show in USA)

I light of current political events in the USA that are deeply affecting the entire world, I have the following statement regarding my upcoming show in the USA.

From my artist statement…
My work is full of visual puns, double entendre, symbolism and satire. It references the dichotomy of my early life expectations to conform to a traditional woman’s role, when in fact, reality for me, was the need to be self-sufficient and support myself as an entrepreneur and business owner. These contradictions allow me to expose my private self through veiled metaphor creating objects significant beyond function. The underlying message – the essence of my work – speaks to the roles and rights of girls and women.

Keeper of the Faith, Encaustic, copper pot scrubber, glass vials, book pages & string, 23″h x 4.25″w x 5″d

My work has meaning. It’s about choice. It’s about girls, and boys too, but mostly girls, who, due to tradition or religion, don’t get to choose. They are married off as soon as they hit puberty and often left to fend for themselves and their children because of war, strife or circumstance.

Gender inequality exists. It exists in Canada, the USA, throughout the western world, but is most prevalent in developing nations. I want to bring awareness to the importance of education and the role it has in shaping future generations. If girls are educated and given choices, they can influence the world.


I’d like to share a few stats with you. Plan Canada and its subsidiary Because I am a Girl states that…

1. For every extra year a girl stays in school, her income can increase by 10 to 20%
2. A girl in the developing world receiving 7 years of education marries 4 years later on average and has fewer, yet healthier, children
3. If all women completed primary education, there would be 66% fewer maternal deaths

Knowledge is power and knowledge is empowering. There’s choice. When there is no alternative there is no choice.


Why am I telling you all this? Because I am part of a 2 person show opening at Frederick Holmes in Seattle on March 3. It means I get to take my white privilege and cross the border into the United States from Canada. I have a Canadian passport, so I should be able to travel unhindered.

EXCEPT, how in good conscious can I travel unhindered when the rights the very people my work speaks to are being detained and turned back?

An incident on Feb 4 had a Canadian woman turned away from U.S. border after questions about religion. She was turned back because she’s muslim. We were told that if you had a Canadian passport there would be no problem crossing the border. They forgot to say you also had to be white, and show no outward signs of your ethnicity.

I could go to the opening and speak about education for girls to a handful of people who already know how important it is. Or I can take this stand and just say NO, it’s not right.

I know, little ol’ me, who is going to notice. Simple. I am going to notice and it is me that I have to live with.

I am very grateful for the support from Frederick Holmes on my boycott of my own show. He works tirelessly for his artists and will be my standin.

Here is Fred’s statement:

 “As her gallery dealer the last few years, and one who has come to know Kim Bruce’s passionate dedication to the mission of her work – as well as an American citizen concerned about the marginalization of people by gender, faith, or race – I support her decision absolutely and without reservation. Her presence at the opening will be missed but her work will speak for her.” – Frederick R. Holmes

As individuals, as artists, as Canadians, as citizens of the world, we must find our conviction.

My conviction says NO, we must stand united.

Further reading:
22 refugees entered Manitoba near Emerson border over the weekend

5th Canadian reports being denied entry to U.S. after questions about Moroccan roots, Muslim faith

Pre-clearance bill would give U.S. border agents in Canada new powers

All my Ancestors were Immigrants.

All my ancestors were immigrants. In fact I would not exist if they had not immigrated. My grandmother would not have met my grandfather here in Canada if she stay in the Ukraine. 

Simple as that.

Kim Henigman Bruce - Merged

“Merged”  now resides in the home of a judge.

I have always been proud that my mom’s mom (featured in this portrait) came to Canada alone when she was 26 and could not speak any english.

I often wondered why at 26 she was not married and what if anything happened that made her make such a journey. But we did not ask those questions growing up, it just wasn’t done.

My grandfather on my mom’s side immigrated from the Ukraine as well. They met in Drumheller where my mom and uncle were born and raised. It’s one of the reasons I was happy to have had the show “How I Got Here” at the Western GM Drumheller Gallery. I think my grandma would have been proud.

I think of this image of my grandmother today because I used her passport photo to create the piece. This piece was purchased a couple of years ago by a judge, which I find ironic considering the current ban on immigration put in place by the Trump administration in the USA. 

 

 

 

Transformation: An Exhibition of Altered Books

Exhibition: September 14 – November 27

Meet the Curators, Judy Daley and Supria Karmakar – September 18th, 2:30 p.m.

Kim Bruce - It Takes a Village

It Takes a Village, Encaustic, false hair, silk ribbon, hand made clay beads on a book, 11″h x 15″w x 2″d overall

When is a book not a book? When it’s been transformed into a one-of-a kind work of art! This fascinating artform dates to medieval times and artists of today are reinventing it to create thought-provoking works of book sculpture. This exhibition features over 50 artists from Canada, the US and Europe. Transformation has been generously supported by Dale and Dave Cox.

Helson Gallery, Halton Hills Cultural Centre
9 Church Street, Halton Hills, ON. L7G 2A3

The Helson Gallery is open Weds – Sun: 1 – 5 pm; Thurs 1 – 8:30 pm

For further information please contact: Judy Daley, Helson Gallery Curator 905.877.7915 x 2536

Transformation Invitation - Helson Gallery (1)_001 Transformation Invitation - Helson Gallery (1)_002

installation-kim-bruce-halton-hills-1 installation-kim-bruce-halton-hills-2

This is Not a Book – Chapter 2

henigman-bruce-this-is-not-a-book-san-jose

San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art
Focus Gallery
560 South First Street San Jose, CA
Jun. 5 – Sep. 11, 2016

In collaboration with Seager Gray Gallery, the ICA will present This is Not a Book: Chapter 2 in the Focus Gallery.

For the past decade, Seager Gray has taken the lead in presenting art related to books and recently celebrated the 10th anniversary of their now widely acclaimed Art of the Book exhibition, which takes place each May at the Mill Valley gallery. The ICA’s presentation culls from that rich history and continues where the ICA’s 2001 exhibition This is Not A Book left off. The current exhibition is curated by Donna Seager.

The typical anatomy of a printed book is text and/or images on paper, bounded by glue or sewn together. On the interior pages, authors write stories and information about places, memories, facts, and images, and on the exterior, a cover details the title of the book, name of the author, and often offers a teaser summary. In This is Not a Book: Chapter 2, 28 artists expand on the very essence of a book. The ubiquitous objects on the shelves of our homes or libraries have been astonishingly altered into wondrous sculptures. One might still discern the materiality of the pages and the characteristics of the covers. However, they are now transfigured into inventive forms, from intimate, finely carved objects to large-scale installations to glowing cubes. With curiosity, whit, and play, artists in This is Not a Book: Chapter 2 create sculptural objects that question our assumptions about book design, the future of the book, and our relationship to these ordinary, but important and cherished publications.

View all artist images

henigman-bruce-this-is-not-a-book-catalog

My page from the catalog.

View the catalog

My Social Media Rules

social media rulesYou can search Google and come up with literally millions of websites that tell you all about being a success on social media sites. It can be overwhelming and it is.

So I decided to make my own social media rules. This is how I interact on the one social media site that I seem to do okay on, Facebook. And by okay I mean people actually talk to me.

Here are my social media rules.

  1. If you post or share an image without saying something about it, I assume that you think the image is worth a 1000 words and my comment isn’t necessary.
  2. The most I will do in this case is “like” but only if I truly do like it.
  3. I may share an image you posted but rules #1 and #2 apply.
  4. If you do happen to say something about an image you posted and if I want to share the image I will make a point of commenting on your post because otherwise it feels like I’m stealing.
  5. I have started random acts of sharing from my feed on my business page. It’s hard since most artists don’t post the title, size and medium of their work. It’s always just one of the aforementioned so when I find an artist that includes all that and a link to their website I get very excited.
  6. Speaking of links. I will share a poster image of your exhibition if you give a link to the venue.
  7. I started finding links and pasting them in the comment area of posts that lack them, but stopped thinking perhaps I was overstepping my bounds plus I could be there all day. And I am not the link police though given time would be. LINKS! Give us LINKS!!
  8. Nobody likes to be ignored. Your minimum required action is to like all comments on your post. The exception to this is rude people who you should actually un-friend if they’re rude.
  9. Speaking of un-friending. Should you decide that you no longer want what I share and un-friend me, that’s okay. I’ll be a bit sad but I won’t whine about.
  10. Unless expressly asked for do not critique art in public on any social media platform.
  11. Please don’t correct my grammar and spelling and I won’t correct yours. It takes all the fun and poignancy out connecting.
  12. If I continually share your stuff and you never share mine, I’ll keep sharing your stuff.

Those are my social media rules. Of course yours maybe different. Do you have social media rules that you use? If so please share them in the comments, I’m dying to know if I’m the only one.

Still Burning – 35 Anniversary of Burns Visual Arts

The Burns Visual Arts Society of Calgary is 35 years old.

The Burns is the oldest continuous artists’ cooperative in Canada with a mandate focused solely on providing affordable working studio space to professional artists in Calgary.

We are celebrating this amazing achievement with Still Burning, an exciting multi-media exhibition at PASSAGE, a new contemporary art space in the Dominion Bridge Building in Ramsay (803, 24 Avenue SE, Calgary).

The exhibition features the work of 20 artists, the current members of the Burns, and runs from September 18, 2014 to January 15, 2015.

Opening reception on Thursday, September 18, 4 to 8 pm.
Please come and celebrate with us!

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Articles and Reviews

Yup It’s Still Burning by Daniel Lindley

BVAS: Still Burning Exhibition by the FDaily Tourist

 

How My Dad Influenced My Art Practice.

My father has had a great influence on my life like most parents. He taught me a work ethic that lead to self employment at an early age, I was 26. But more than that he influenced how I look at the world and interpret that with my unique visual language. This is how my dad influenced my art practice.

Alan David Henigman was born in Saskatoon in 1928. He settled in Calgary in the 1950’s and bought a lot in the community of Millican Ogden in the south east. The land already had the foundation of a house and that’s it.

Not being wealthy man and no house plans he did his own design build. The story goes that he would purchase building materials pay cheque to pay cheque. He would problem solve as he went along.

Being an appliance repair man for General Electric, he also moonlighted by reconditioning old washers, dryers, fridges, and the like.  His work shop was in the basement and attached garage and he was always picking up broken appliances to fix and resell. Word spread because his repairs lasted. What he couldn’t fix he recycled, used for parts or as my list below mentions, repurposed.

Some of my favourite examples of his repurposing are…

  • Using copper tubing, more than likely left over from the plumbing, for the kitchen cupboard pulls.
  • Salvaging and using old oven doors from his appliance repairs and construction a window for our back porch.
  • The ceiling in the living room was a wood vaulted ceiling made from salvaged wood doors.
  • The towel rack in the bathroom was a salvaged oven door pull.
  • The front stairs to our home was a design of his own and he constructed and pored the concrete himself.
  • Not having enough siding to complete the length of the front porch railing he cut a detail to finish the shortage.
our-house-me-dad

My Dad and me at the BBQ slash fire pit he designed and built in the 60’s well before it was fashionable to have an outdoor cookery.

My Dad is the very definition of “function before form”. The most important thing to him was that it work.  The ascetic of our home was my Mother’s territory. My Dad taught me to look at my surroundings and the objects in it with new eyes. It’s not just a piece of copper tubing, it’s a door pull. It not just a window for an oven door, it’s actually a window for anything.

So when you see objects used in my work now you know why.

Do you have an unsung person that influenced your art? Who was it and how did they influence you?

I gratefully acknowledge Ann Hart Marquis who interviewed me about my work and really got me thinking. As a result this blog post was born. Thank You Ann for making me think.

Starker Auftritt! Stepping into the Limelight!

Starker Auftritt!/Stepping into the Limelight!
GRASSI Museum für Angewandte Kunst, Leipzig, Germany
March 28 – September 29, 2013
Alberta Foundation for the Arts

Kim Bruce gratefully acknowledges the grant support from the A.F.A. to produce the work in the Heels series.

Kim-Bruce_Step-Lightly.jpg

Step Lightly, Cast encasutic, pins & needles,vintage dressmaker pattern, 5″ x 2.5″ x 7.5″

The Grassi museum presents: Over a 100 fascinating and surprising footwear creations from around the world. The selection shows the architecture in miniature shoes, shoes with socio- critical potential, with historical referenced shoes or shoes that are not obvious at first glance. The exhibition is complemented by photos and videos of shoe performances.

World renowned artists, architects and designers such as Keith Haring and Zaha Hadid have rediscovered the shoe itself. They present the amazing and bizarre, and provide a variety of aesthetic and cultural aspects. The range of materials used is far reaching: futuristic high-tech fabrics, ceramics, wood, glass, elephant dung, paper and of course leather and fabric were used as the starting material. Portable or not? The original and ingenious designs are unlimited. It’s all about the shoe as an art form, to be reshaped as sculpture.

(. An exhibition in cooperation with the Dutch Liza Snook It operates a virtual shoe museum: www.virtualshoemuseum.com ) Kim’s listing at the Virtual Shoe Museum http://www.virtualshoemuseum.com/kim-bruce

2013 Starker Auftritt! Experimentelles Schuh-Design. 28.03. bis

Media Coverage
Tages Schau – “Strong performance” in stylish offenders
Mittags | Magazin -Strong performance
High Heels im Grassi-Museum (Video)

PDF’s

Download (PDF, 977KB)

Download (PDF, 572KB)

I Like Computer Code, there I said it

As I get to know more artists I’m finding that not only do some have day jobs but another passion outside of their art.

I have found doctors, engineers, welders and technical drafts-people. What’s fascinating to me is that these disciplines are considered left brain while art on a whole is consider right. You know, math and science.

Personally I don’t think that creativity is limited to one brain hemisphere. Einstein was very creative.

I wonder if by keeping these other careers private we are trying to live up to the artistic mystic. When in fact they may add credibility to another wise known flaky artist. OR is it the other way around? Admitting the you are a doctor, lawyer or an accountant means you’re not a serious artist?

Well these are points to ponder and I imagine you have good arguments for both.

As for me, I freely admit that I LIKE COMPUTER CODE! As they say in the WordPress world “code is poetry”. My other passion is over at Artbiz.ca

SO DO YOU THINK IT A BAD CAREER MOVE AS AN ARTIST TO EMBRACE YOUR OTHER SIDE AND COME OUT OF THE PROVERBIAL CLOSET?

Thanks to Lori Zebier whose admission inspired this post.